Home

Wild health is robust, adaptable, and self-reliant.

My practice is based on observation of the natural world. I look for what works; what helps us get well, stay well, and live longer without reliance on industrialized medicine. Rooted in a background of scientific research in animal behaviour and physiology, and willing to explore whatever works, I use an integrative approach drawing on traditional and modern practices of health-maintenance. In short, applied psycho-biology.

Achieving a natural vitality involves taking responsibility for our own well being.

Practices which integrate physical, emotional, and mental cultivation are important for long term health management. The longevity practices of Taoist adepts, Qigong and Neigong, are particularly powerful in this regard. Getting ourselves moving using mindful processes is increasingly important in modern sedentary lifestyles. More details…

Receiving regular assessments and treatments from competent bodyworkers can reduce a need for medication or surgery, and also identify emerging health problems before they become serious. This makes it possible to make proactive changes in our lifestyle to maintain health.  More details…

“Years after recovering from a slipped disc, any stress continued to go straight to the same weakness, leaving me in agony and completely debilitated. Shiatsu treatments have made a very real difference to my life – I feel like I have a new body – one which no longer lets me down.” Lynne Ward (Head teacher)

Wild animals do not rely on the pharmaceutical industry to cure their ills. They have evolved and developed a range of health maintenance strategies to enhance survival. Wild animals therefore make excellent models of a healthy lifestyle. My original training as a biologist lead me to research and publish the first book on animal self-medication.  Natural selection has favored those animals who find health-modulating substances in the wild. Remnants of these abilities are still functional in humans and domestic animals although disrupted by modern dietary imbalances and lack of experiential development. [Photo: chimpanzee selecting medicine c/o Prof M. Huffman] More details…